BruceTrail2011
Margaret and I spent 10 days hiking the Bruce Trail in July, 2011, staying at B&Bs through the Home to Home Network.
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Just north of Wiarton, Wiarton harbour in background. I think this was an installation to protect the bank, but not really sure. In any case, I liked the look of it.
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Just a little farther along.
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Between Wiarton and Colpoy's Bay, the ruins of the Macneill mansion, which until the 1970s was apparently occupied. Heritage site bumpf says it was a "17-room mansion," though the rooms must have been pretty small. Margaret at left.
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Waterfall, Colpoy's Bay
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Viewpoint, between Purple Valley and Cape Croker.
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Huge rock, ready to fall into the lake, if the lake hadn't receded dozens of meters by now.
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Some cliffs are easier to scale than others, thanks to the Bruce Trail Association.
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Between Purple Valley and Cape Croker. The lake used to erode under this rock, before it receded.
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Between Purple Valley and Cape Croker. The lake used to erode under this rock, before it receded.
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Between Purple Valley and Cape Croker, we found Pooh's treehouse. He's apparently taken in some woodpeckers as boarders.
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Between Cape Croker and Hope Bay. Some parts of the trail were easy walking.(The Chippewas of Nawash (Cape Croker) built this boardwalk, almost 1 km long, for the Bruce Trail Assn.)
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Between Cape Croker and Hope Bay. Some parts of the trail were easy walking.(The Chippewas of Nawash (Cape Croker) built this boardwalk, almost 1 km long, for the Bruce Trail Assn.)
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Between Cape Croker and Hope Bay. Some parts of the trail not so much.
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Between Cape Croker and Hope Bay. Margaret in the woods. Later, she abandoned the short pants to protect against poison ivy and mosquitoes.
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Margaret on a bluff overlooking Hope Bay. Starting point of the day's hike was in the small community visible at the top.
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From a viewpoint over Hope Bay, with Bull's Landing and Jackson's Cove in the background.
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Between Jackson's Cove and Cape Dundas, a natural bridge as seen from the trail. We sometimes discovered we were walking on one of these, and could see the rocks below through openings in the bridge.
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The view from the escarpment overlooking Cape Dundas.
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Large shale rocks piled up on the shores of Rush Cove. Imagine the power it takes to toss these rocks around!
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Margaret on the beach at Rush Cove.
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Old caboose in the yard at the marine and rail museum in Owen Sound. On a day off from hiking we had a picnic lunch in Owen Sound.
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The marine and rail museum is in an old CNR rail station.
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copyright Brian Robinson
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From the escarpment overlooking Dyer's Bay.
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The Devil's Monument, on the escarpment over Dyer's Bay. Don't know what the devil had to do with it. It used to be an arch, but then the arch fell in—the stone that made up the arch can be seen to the left of the monument.
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The intrepid hikers, at Crane Lake Road just outside Bruce Peninsula National Park. (Somebody could use a haircut!) As it's the beginning of the day, we're not yet covered with sweat. Those of you who think walking poles are for wusses and Europeans get ready to have your minds changed. I wouldn't climb an upgrade now without them!
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We didn't SEE any bears, but we sure knew they were there!
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I've always loved these ferns, which look to my eye positively pre-historic. It's also an opportunity to show off my macro-photographic skills, i.e. almost none!
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I've always loved these ferns, which look to my eye positively pre-historic. It's also an opportunity to show off my macro-photographic skills, i.e. almost none!
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We stayed a couple nights at the Cape Chin Connection, a wonderfull B&B/Inn well off the beaten track. Rooms were small, but the food was terrific!
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In Bruce Peninsula National Park. A natural cave, caused by settling rock and erosion.
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Margaret on the trail to the Grotto, in Bruce Peninsula National Park.
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Cliffs and vegetation, Bruce Peninsula National Park
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Not a pleasant landing if you fall.
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Civilization!
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More cliffs, Bruce Peninsula National Park
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This is NOT the Grotto, Bruce Peninsula National Park, but a lot of people think it is. Unfortunately I didn't manage to take a photo of the ACTUAL Grotto.
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This is NOT the Grotto, Bruce Peninsula National Park, but a lot of people think it is. Unfortunately I didn't manage to take a photo of the ACTUAL Grotto
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Perhaps not surprisingly, this is known as "Boulder Beach, in Bruce Peninsula National Park.
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While you might think this is a photo of a hole in the ground, it is actually "the largest visible sinkhole in the Bruce Peninsula." It was created by the collapse of a cave.
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The Ch-Cheemaun, the ferry between Tobermory and South Baymouth, Manitoulin Island, 6:15am, apparently ready to take on vehicles.
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Tobermory harbour, 6:15am
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Tobermory harbour, 6:15am