Public Relations

More "rebel" BS in Syria: Madaya outrage fakery

Brian Sun, 2016-01-10 11:17

By now, the "rebels" in Syria, and their enablers ... have compiled a solid record of fiction and BS. Their eagerness to smear the elected government of Syria (the "Assad regime") knows no bounds, and no untruth is spared in the effort

Charleston: We DO Love our (White) Killers, don't we?

Brian Sun, 2015-06-21 19:08

Dylann thought this, Dylann thought that, Dylann's "manifesto." Dylann opening Christmas presents. Jesus Murphy.

Why do we obsess over our white killers so? We don't obsess like this over the Black ones, do we?

RIP, "blowback"

Brian Sun, 2012-09-23 04:54

We're in the process of losing a really good word: "blowback."

How are we losing it? A lot of writers think it's a pretty cool word, and writers like to use cool words. Unfortunately, they don't know what it means. They think it means "reaction."

It doesn't. It's a word invented by CIA operatives to describe the negative, often surprising, consequences that rebound on an actor because of things that actor does in pursuit of their own objectives. It's a very special type of reaction. Here're some examples:

Police "PR," Australia style

Brian Fri, 2012-01-27 16:15

Australia is agog.

"Prime Minister attacked by wild mob." "Gillard saved from Aboriginal riot by police." Lurid media stories are accompanied by photos of Prime Minister Julia Gillard being hauled through a crowd of police, losing her shoe, stumbling and falling at one point, being shoved into a car, and hauled to "safety."

Who the heck is Brian?

I was a long-time Canadian trade union organizer and bureaucrat (not in its negative sense, I hope!), now retired and adventuring in SE Asia.

I got involved in the trade union movement when I was in graduate school at the University of Toronto, and never looked back. For many years I was active in the Canadian Union of Educational Workers, a trade union of teaching and research assistants, student lecturers, and part-time faculty in Canadian post-secondary education. Originally organized by those educational workers themselves, it has since been devoured by CUPE.

Seriously, folks!

Brian Sat, 2011-04-16 11:00

I have on occasion advised spokespersons that they ought to remove the sentence, "We take [some issue] very seriously" from their quiver of PR speaking points. I explain that just about everyone confronted by an issue these days claims to take it "very seriously," even when they obviously don't, to the point where the phrase just doesn't mean anything any more. Even when I explain, I find myself confronted with looks of incomprehension. It seems like it just doesn't compute.