Public Relations

More "rebel" BS in Syria: Madaya outrage fakery

By now, the "rebels" in Syria, and their enablers ... have compiled a solid record of fiction and BS. Their eagerness to smear the elected government of Syria (the "Assad regime") knows no bounds, and no untruth is spared in the effort

Charleston: We DO Love our (White) Killers, don't we?

Dylann thought this, Dylann thought that, Dylann's "manifesto." Dylann opening Christmas presents. Jesus Murphy.

Why do we obsess over our white killers so? We don't obsess like this over the Black ones, do we?

RIP, "blowback"

We're in the process of losing a really good word: "blowback."

How are we losing it? A lot of writers think it's a pretty cool word, and writers like to use cool words. Unfortunately, they don't know what it means. They think it means "reaction."

It doesn't. It's a word invented by CIA operatives to describe the negative, often surprising, consequences that rebound on an actor because of things that actor does in pursuit of their own objectives. It's a very special type of reaction. Here're some examples:

Police "PR," Australia style

Australia is agog.

"Prime Minister attacked by wild mob." "Gillard saved from Aboriginal riot by police." Lurid media stories are accompanied by photos of Prime Minister Julia Gillard being hauled through a crowd of police, losing her shoe, stumbling and falling at one point, being shoved into a car, and hauled to "safety."

About Us

For thirteen years Brian was the Communications Officer for the Society of Energy Professionals. Given the turmoil in the electricity industry in Ontario, he was active in nurturing their reputation as a reliable source for information about the industry, where it's going, and how best to ensure Ontarians continue to benefit from affordable, reliable, safe electricity.

And, not to put too fine a point on it, their primary function was to ensure the professional employees in the industry continue to enjoy rewarding careers, decent working conditions, and secure retirements.

Seriously, folks!

I have on occasion advised spokespersons that they ought to remove the sentence, "We take [some issue] very seriously" from their quiver of PR speaking points. I explain that just about everyone confronted by an issue these days claims to take it "very seriously," even when they obviously don't, to the point where the phrase just doesn't mean anything any more. Even when I explain, I find myself confronted with looks of incomprehension. It seems like it just doesn't compute.

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